Tag Archives: programming

Top 5 Attributes of Highly Effective Programmers

What attributes can contribute to a highly successful software developer versus the ordinary run-of-the-mill kind? I don’t believe the attributes listed here are the end-all, be-all list, nor do I believe you have to be born with them. Nearly all things in life can be learned, and these attributes are no exception.

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Humility

Humility is first because it implies all the other attributes, or at least enables them. There are a lot of misunderstandings of what humility is and sometimes it’s easier to explain it by describing what humility isn’t:

  • humility isn’t letting people walk all over you
  • humility isn’t suppressing your opinions
  • humility isn’t thinking you’re a crappy programmer

C.S. Lewis said it best, in the literary guise of a devil trying to subvert humanity:

Let him think of [humility] not as self-forgetfulness but as a certain kind of opinion (namely, a low opinion) of his own talents and character. . . Fix in his mind the idea that humility consists in trying to believe those talents to be less valuable than he believes them to be. . . By this method thousands of humans have been brought to think that humility means pretty women trying to believe they are ugly and clever men trying to believe they are fools.*

Ok, so we realize humility isn’t pretending to be worse than you are and it’s not timidity. So what is it?

Simply put, humility is an understanding that the world doesn’t begin and end with you. It’s accepting that you don’t know everything there is to know about WPF, or Perl, or Linux. It’s an acknowledgment of the fact that, even if you’re an expert in some particular area, there is still much to learn. In fact, there is far more to learn than you could possibly do in a lifetime, and that’s ok.

Once you start assuming you’re the expert and final word on something, you’ve stopped growing, stopped learning, and stopped progressing. Pride can make you obsolete faster than you can say “Java”.

The fact is that even if you’re humble, you’re probably pretty smart. If you work in a small organization with few programmers (or any organization with few good programmers), chances are you’re more intelligent than the majority of them when it comes to computers. (If you are smarter than all of them about everything, then either you failed the humility test or you need to get out of that company fast). Since you happen to know more about computers and how software works than most people, and since everybody’s life increasingly revolves around using computers, this will give you the illusion that you are smarter than others about everything. This is usually a mistake.

Take Sales and Marketing for example. I have about 50 Dilbert strips hung in my office. I would guess half of them make fun of Sales or Marketing in some way. It’s easy, it’s fun, and it’s often richly deserved!

But if they didn’t sell your software, you wouldn’t get paid. You need them as much as they need you. If someone asked you to go sell your software, how would you do it? Do you even like talking to people? As clueless as they are about the realities of software development, they have skills you don’t.

There are some industries where extreme ego will get you places. I do not believe this to be the usual case in software, at least in companies run by people who understand software. Ego is not enough–results matter. If you have a big ego, you’d better be able to back it up. Unfortunately, the problem with egos is that they grow–eventually you won’t be able to keep up with it, and people will see through you.

The competent programmer is fully aware of the strictly limited size of his own skull; therefore he approaches the programming task in full humility, and among other things he avoids clever tricks like the plague. – Dijkstra

Without humility, you will make mistakes. Actually, even with humility you’ll make mistakes, but you’ll realize it sooner. By assuming that you know how to solve a problem immediately, you may take steps to short-circuit the development process. You may think you understand the software so well that you can easily fix a bug with just a few tweaks…and yet, you didn’t realize that this other function over here is now broken. A humble programmer will first say “I don’t know the right way to solve this yet” and take the time to do the analysis.

Finally, humble people are a lot more pleasant to work with. They don’t make their superiority an issue. They don’t always have the “right answer” (meaning everybody else is wrong, of course). You can do pair programming with a humble person, you can do code reviews with a humble person, you can instruct a humble person.

Leave your ego out of programming.

It’s not at all important to get it right the first time. It’s vitally important to get it right the last time. – Andrew Hunt and David Thomas

Perhaps most importantly, a humble programmer can instruct him/herself…

Love of Learning

If you’re new to this whole programming thing, I hate to break it to you: school has just begun. Whatever you thought of your BS/MS in Computer Science you worked so hard at–it was just the beginning. It will get you your first job or two, but that’s it. If you can’t learn as you go, from now until you retire, you’re dead weight. Sure, you’ll be able to find a job working somewhere with your pet language for the rest of your life–COBOL and Fortran are still out there after all, but if you really want to progress you’re going to have to learn.

Learning is not compulsory. Neither is survival. – W. Edwards Deming

This means reading. A lot. If you don’t like reading, I suggest you start–get into Harry Potter, fantasy, science fiction, historical fiction, whatever. Something. Just read. Then get some technical books. Start with my list of essential developer books. They’re not as exciting as Harry Potter, but they’re not bad either.

A lot material is online, but for high quality, authoritative prose on fundamental subjects, a good book beats all.

Reading isn’t enough, though. You have to practice. You have to write your own test projects. You have to force yourself to push your boundaries. You can start by typing in code sample, but then you need to change them in ways unique to you. You should have personal projects and hobbies that expand your skills. Be writing your own tools, or “fun” programs. Write a game. Do what it takes to learn new things!

The type of programs you write have a big bearing on how well you learn new material. It has to be something that interests you, or you won’t keep it up. In my case, I’m developing software related to my LEGO hobby. In the past, I’ve written tools for word puzzles, system utilities, multimedia plug-ins, and more. They all started out of a need I had, or a desire to learn something new and useful to me personally.

Another aspect of this love of learning is related to debugging software. An effective developer is not satisfied with a problem until they understand how it works, why it happens, and the details of how to fix it. The details matter–understanding why a bug occurs is just as important as knowing what to do to fix it.

Learn from mistakes. I have seen programmers who make a mistake, have the correct solution pointed out to them, say, “huh, wonder why it didn’t work for me”, and go on their merry way, none-the-wiser. Once their code is working “the way it should” they’re done. They don’t care why or how–it works and that’s enough. It’s not enough! Understand the mistake,what fixed it, and why.

Good judgement comes from experience, and experience comes from bad judgement. – Fred Brooks

Obviously, some balance has to be struck here. You cannot learn everything–it simply isn’t possible. Our profession is becoming increasingly specialized because there is simply too much out there. I also think that in some respects, you need to love learning just for the sake of learning.

Detail-orientedness

Developing software with today’s technologies is all about the details. Maybe in 100 years, software will progress to the point where it can write itself, be fully component-pluggable, self-documenting, self-testing, and then…there won’t be any programmers. But until that comes along (if ever), get used to paying attention to a lot of details.

To illustrate: pick a feature of any software product, and try to think of all the work that would have to be done to change it in some way. For anything non-trivial, you could probably come up with a list of a hundred discrete tasks: modifying the UI (which includes graphics, text, localization, events, customization, etc.), unit tests, algorithms, interaction with related components, and on and on, each discrete step being broken into sub-steps.

I have always found that plans are useless, but planning is indispensable. – Dwight Eisenhower

Here’s a problem, though: few humans can keep every single task in their head, especially over time. Thankfully, detail-orientedness does not necessarily mean being able to mentally track each and every detail. It means that you develop a mental pattern to deal with them. For example, the steps of changing a piece of software could be:

  1. Thoroughly understand what the code is doing and why
  2. Look for any and all dependencies and interactions with this code
  3. Have a well-thought-out mental picture of how it fits together.
  4. Examine the consequences of changing the feature.
  5. Update all related code that needs to (and repeat this cycle for those components)
  6. Update auxiliary pieces that might depend on this code (build system, installer, tests, documentation, etc.)
  7. Test and repeat.

An example: I find that as I’m working on a chunk of code, I realize there are several things I need to do after I’m finished with my immediate task. If I don’t do them, the software will break. If I try to remember all of them, one will surely slip by the wayside. I have a few choices here:

  1. Defer until later, while trying to remember them all
  2. Do them immediately
  3. Defer until later, after writing  them down

Each of these might be useful in different circumstances. Well…maybe not #1. I think that’s doomed to failure from the start and creates bad habits. If the secondary tasks  are short, easy, and well-understood, just do them immediately and get back to your primary task.

However, if you know they’ll require a lot of work, write them down. I prefer a sturdy engineering notebookin nearly all cases, but text files, Outlook tasks, notes, OneNote, bug tracking systems, and other methods can all work together to enable this.

The more experience you have, the easier you’ll be able to track the details you need to worry about. You’ll also analyze them quicker, but you will always need some way of keeping track of what you need to do next. There are simply too many details. Effective organization is a key ability of any good software engineer.

Another aspect of paying attention to details is critical thinking. Critical thinking implies a healthy skepticism about everything you do. It is particularly important as you examine the details of your implementation, designs, or plans. It’s the ability to pull out of those details what is important, what is correct, or on the other hand, what is garbage and should be thrown out. It also guides when you should use well-known methods of development, and when you need to come up with a novel solution to a hard problem.

Adaptability

“Enjoying success requires the ability to adapt. Only by being open to change will you have a true opportunity to get the most from your talent.” – Nolan Ryan

Change happens. Get used to it. This is a hard one for me, to tell the truth. I really, really like having a plan and following it, adapting it to my needs, not those of others.

The fact is, in software development, the project you end up writing will not be the one you started. This can be frustrating if you don’t know how to handle it.

To become adaptive first requires a change in mind set. This mind set says that change is inevitable, it’s ok, and you’re ready for it. How do you become ready for it? This is a whole other topic in itself, and I will probably devote a separate essay for it.

Other than the shift in mind set, start using techniques and technologies that enable easy change. Things like unit testing, code coverage, and refactoring all enable easier modification of code.

In war as in life, it is often necessary when some cherished scheme has failed, to take up the best alternative open, and if so, it is folly not to work for it with all your might. – Winston Churchill

For me, the first step in changing my mind set is to not get frustrated every time things change (“But you specifically said we were NOT going to implement the feature to work this way!”).

Passion

I think passion is up there with humility in importance. It’s so fundamental, that without it, the others don’t matter.

Anyone can dabble, but once you’ve made that commitment, your blood has that particular thing in it, and it’s very hard for people to stop you. – Bill Cosby

It’s also the hardest to develop. I’m not sure if it’s innate or not. In my own case, I think my passion developed at a very early age. It’s been there as long as I remember, even if I had periods of not doing much with it.

I’ve interviewed dozens of prospective developers at my current job, and this is the one thing I see consistently lacking. So many of them are in it just for another job. If that’s all you want, just a job to pay the bills, so be it. (Of course, I have to ask, if that’s the case, why are you reading this article?)

One person with passion is better than forty people merely interested. – E. M. Forster

There’s a world of difference between someone who just programs and someone who loves to program. Someone who just programs will probably not be familiar with the latest tools, practices, techniques, or technologies making their way down the pipeline. They won’t think about programming outside of business hours. On the weekends, they do their best to forget about computers. They have no personal projects, no favorite technologies, no blogs they like to read, and no drive to excel. They have a hard time learning new things and can be a large burden on an effective development team.

Ok, that’s maybe a bit of exaggeration, but by listing the counterpoints, it’s easier to see symptoms of someone who does have passion:

  • Thinks and breaths technology
  • Reads blogs about programming
  • Reads books about programming
  • Writes a blog about programming
  • Has personal projects
  • These personal projects are more important than the boring stuff at work
  • Keeps up with latest technologies for their interests
  • Pushes for implementation of the latest technologies (not blindly, of course)
  • Goes deep in technical problems.
  • Not content with merely coding to spec.
  • Needs an outlet of creativity, whether it be professional (software design) or personal (music, model building, LEGO building, art, etc.)
  • Thinks of the world in terms of Star Trek

Just kidding on the last one…

…(maybe)

That’s my list. It’s taken a few months to write this, and I hope it’s genuinely useful to someone, especially new, young software engineers just getting started. This is a hard industry, but it should also be fun. Learning these attributes, changing your mind set, and consciously deciding to become the engineer and programmer you want to be are the first steps. And also part of every step thereafter.

Nobody is born with any of these–they are developed, practiced, and honed to perfection over a lifetime. There is no better time to start than now.

* The Screwtape Letters, C.S. Lewis


Check out my latest book, the essential, in-depth guide to performance for all .NET developers:

Writing High-Performance.NET Code, 2nd Edition by Ben Watson. Available for pre-order:

Easily Unit Testing Event Handlers

In C#, If you need to unit test a class that fires an event in certain circumstances (perhaps even asynchronously), you need to handle a little more than just running some code and doing the assertion. You have to make sure your unit test waits for the event to be fired. Here’s one naive way of doing it, a WRONG way:

   1: private bool statsUpdated = false;
   2: private ManualResetEvent statsUpdatedEvent = new ManualResetEvent(false);
   3:
   4: [Test]
   5: public void CheckStats()
   6: {
   7:     BrickDatabase db = new BrickDatabase(tempFolder, maxCacheAge);
   8:
   9:     statsUpdated = false;
  10:     statsUpdatedEvent.Reset();
  11:
  12:     db.InventoryStatsUpdated += new EventHandler(db_InventoryStatsUpdated);
  13:     db.DoSomethingThatFiresEvent();
  14:
  15:     statsUpdatedEvent.WaitOne();
  16:
  17:     Assert.IsTrue(statsUpdated);
  18: }
  19:
  20: void db_InventoryStatsUpdated(object sender, EventArgs e)
  21: {
  22:     statsUpdated = true;
  23:     statsUpdatedEvent.Set();
  24: }

There are a number of things wrong with this:

  1. The class variables. More complex unit test class. Have to coordinate these variables across multiple functions.
  2. Since they are class variables, you will want to reuse them, but you’d better remember to reset the event and the boolean every time!
  3. Have to have two functions to do something really, really simple.
  4. The WaitOne() does not have a timeout, so if the wait is ever satisfied then statsUpdated is guaranteed to be true.

Here’s a better way of doing it, using anonymous methods in C# 2.0:

   1: [Test]
   2: public void CheckStats()
   3: {
   4:     BrickDatabase db = new BrickDatabase(tempFolder, maxCacheAge);
   5:     bool statsUpdated = false;
   6:     ManualResetEvent statsUpdatedEvent = new ManualResetEvent(false);
   7:
   8:     db.InventoryStatsUpdated += delegate
   9:     {
  10:         statsUpdated = true;
  11:         statsUpdatedEvent.Set();
  12:     };
  13:
  14:     db.DoSomethingThatFiresEvent();
  15:
  16:     statsUpdatedEvent.WaitOne(5000,false);
  17:
  18:     Assert.IsTrue(statsUpdated);
  19: }

Improvements?

  1. The event is just part of the method. Since the event handler is an anonymous delegate, it can access the enclosing method’s local variables.
  2. Added 5,000ms timeout to the WaitOne() function to prevent hanging of unit tests.

Check out my latest book, the essential, in-depth guide to performance for all .NET developers:

Writing High-Performance.NET Code, 2nd Edition by Ben Watson. Available for pre-order:

BugTracker.Net

I’ve been meaning to write about this software for a while. When I started my current job, all software development was done by an outside contractor. I quickly took over, and that necessitated implementing a lot of tools and procedures to handle our large C++ and C# code base.

Choosing Subversion for source control was easy–free, open source, better than VSS and CVS.

Bug tracking software was a little harder. There are a lot of packages out there. I eventually decided on a great little package called BugTracker.Net. It’s written by a gentleman named Corey Trager who does it in his spare time. It’s a very simple system, and doesn’t provide a lot of the heavy-weight features of more complete packages, but if you’re a small team (like I’m in), then it could be perfect. I really appreciate Corey’s web-site, because he acknowledges that it’s not written with every scenario in mind. In fact, he even publicizes comparisons of his system with other popular tracking systems out there.

That said, there is a good degree of customizability in it, and it really was easy to setup, upgrade, configure, and customize.

Some of the features:

Suitable for tracking helpdesk customer support tickets as well as software bugs.

Sending and receiving emails is integrated with the tracker, so that the email thread about a bug is tracked WITH the bug.

Allows incoming emails to be recorded as bugs. So, for example, an email from your customer could automatically be turned into an bug/ticket in the tracker.

Allows you to attach files and screenshots to bugs. There is even a custom screen capture utility [screenshot] that lets you take a screenshot, annotate it, and post it as a bug with just a few clicks. (inspired by Fogbugz)

Add your own custom fields.

Custom bug lists, filtered and sorted the way you want, with the columns that you want.

You can display bugs of a certain priority and/or status in a different color, so that the most important items grab your attention.

Configure different user roles to see different lists of bugs. For example, a developer might see a list of open bugs. A QA analyst might want to see a list of bugs ready for testing.

(and more…)

Like I said, if you’re a small team that just needs to coordinate on issues, this platform could be perfect.

(BTW, this is not a sponsored post–I just want to point out some software that I like).


Check out my latest book, the essential, in-depth guide to performance for all .NET developers:

Writing High-Performance.NET Code, 2nd Edition by Ben Watson. Available for pre-order:

Don’t delay your merging

Another one of those lessons learned posts. I know I’m supposed to merge changes across branches often to minimize the pain, but I didn’t do it.

Here’s the scenario: We’ve got 3 development branches: 6.3, 6.4, and 7.0 (the trunk). 6.3 and 6.4 are technically maintenance branches because we didn’t anticipate needing to them, but we are. Here’s where it gets funny. 6.4 is actually a branch off of 7.0 with some new features removed. 6.4 is the code base converted to handle unicode. 6.3 is the current development version, and it’s features need to be merged into 6.4 These two branches are rather divergent in places. It’s been months since the branches were synchronized. In addition to 20 conflicted files, the 13 localized resource DLLs can’t automatically be merged because their location changed. Yeesh…

So now I’m spending all day using DiffMerge to do these files. Not a fun day…

Lesson learned. Do frequent merges.

At least it’s Friday. Tomorrow, my wife and I are heading down to North Carolina to visit my grandmother before she heads to California for Christmas.

By the way, still no Internet at home. Comcast says it could be 28 days before the local construction company gets around to installing the new drop to our home. I’ve been getting a lot of piano practice and reading in.


Check out my latest book, the essential, in-depth guide to performance for all .NET developers:

Writing High-Performance.NET Code, 2nd Edition by Ben Watson. Available for pre-order:

Difference between ConfigurationSettings and ConfigurationManager

If you upgraded a project from .Net 1.0/1.1 to .Net 2.0, and it used application configuration files, you will soon come across the compiler warning message

‘System.Configuration.ConfigurationSettings.AppSettings’ is obsolete: ‘This method is obsolete, it has been replaced by System.Configuration!System.Configuration.ConfigurationManager.AppSettings’   

You have to add a reference to the System.Configuration assembly, but once you do, you can just do a search and replace on ConfigurationSettings.AppSettings and replace it with ConfigurationManager.AppSettings and the functionality will remain the same.

The advantage of using ConfigurationManager is laid out in the MSDN docs, but briefly:

  1. Access sections other than appConfig, including connectionStrings, and your own custom sections
  2. Can read and write the configuration.
  3. It can have separate settings for the application and the users
  4. It’s extensible

Check out my latest book, the essential, in-depth guide to performance for all .NET developers:

Writing High-Performance.NET Code, 2nd Edition by Ben Watson. Available for pre-order:

The Effective Software Developer’s Book List

What books should all serious developers read and study? This is a list of books that I have either found particularly helpful in my own growth as a programmer, or that are popular on various required-reading lists. I have bolded books I consider absolute required reading (probably multiple times) for all software developers.

I’ve gathered these books from multiple sources, beginning with Steve McConnell’s list in the back of Code Complete.

By the way, just because a book is listed in the Introductory section does not mean you shouldn’t read it because you’re advanced.

Why the Have I Read? column? To keep me honest, and to serve as my own checklist.

(Updated 11/28 – PeopleWare)
(Updated 12/7 – Design of Everyday Things)
(Updated 1/26 – Beautiful Code, Essay section)
(Updated 6/3 – Pragmatic Unit Testing in C# with NUnit)

Introductory

Book

Have I Read?

Code Complete: A Practical Handbook of Software Construction
Steve McConnell
Y
Conceptual Blockbusting: A Guide to Better Ideas
James L. Adams
 
Programming Pearls (2nd Edition) (ACM Press)
Jon Bentley
Y
Facts and Fallacies of Software Engineering
Robert Glass
 
The Pragmatic Programmer: From Journeyman to Master
Andrew Hunt and David Thomas
Y
Object-Oriented Design Heuristics
Arther Riel
Y
UML Distilled: A Brief Guide to the Standard Object Modeling Language (3rd Edition) (The Addison-Wesley Object Technology Series)
Martin Fowler
 
Applying UML and Patterns: An Introduction to Object-Oriented Analysis and Design and Iterative Development (3rd Edition)
Craig Larman
 
Refactoring Workbook
William Wake
 
The Mythical Man-Month: Essays on Software Engineering, Anniversary Edition (2nd Edition)
Frederick Brooks
Y
Introduction to Algorithms
Thomas Cormen
 

Intermediate

Book Have I Read?
Software Configuration Management Patterns: Effective Teamwork, Practical Integration
Stephen Berczuk and Brad Appleton
 
Software Creativity 2.0
Robert Glass
 
Testing Computer Software, 2nd Edition
Cem Kaner, Jack Falk, Hung Q. Nguyen
 
Rapid Development
Steve McConnell
 
Software Requirements, Second Edition
Karl Wiegers
 
“Manager’s Handbook for Software Development” (PDF)
NASA Goddard Space Flight Center
 
Patterns of Enterprise Application Architecture (The Addison-Wesley Signature Series)
Martin Fowler
 
Test Driven Development: By Example (The Addison-Wesley Signature Series)
Kent Beck
Y
Pragmatic Unit Testing in C# with NUnit, 2nd Edition
Andy Hunt, Dave Thomas, Matt Hargett
Y
Refactoring to Patterns (The Addison-Wesley Signature Series)
Joshua Kerievsky
 
Head First Design Patterns (Head First)
Elisabeth Freeman, Eric Freeman, Bert Bates, Kathy Sierra
 
User Stories Applied: For Agile Software Development (The Addison-Wesley Signature Series)
Mike Cohn
 
Agile Principles, Patterns, and Practices in C# (Robert C. Martin Series)
Robert Martin
 
Applying Domain-Driven Design and Patterns: With Examples in C# and .NET
Jimmy Nilsson
 
Extreme Programming Explained: Embrace Change (2nd Edition) (The XP Series)
Kent Beck
 
The Design of Everyday Things
Donald A. Norman
Y
Beautiful Code: Leading Programmers Explain How They Think  

Professional

Book Have I Read?
Software Architecture in Practice (2nd Edition) (The SEI Series in Software Engineering)
Len Bass, Paul Clements, and Rick Kazman
 
Refactoring: Improving the Design of Existing Code (The Addison-Wesley Object Technology Series)
Martin Fowler
Y
Design Patterns: Elements of Reusable Object-Oriented Software (Addison-Wesley Professional Computing Series)
Eric Gamma, Richard Helm, Ralph Johnson, John Vlissides
Y
Principles Of Software Engineering Management
Tom Gilb
 
Writing Solid Code
Steve Maguire
 
Domain-Driven Design: Tackling Complexity in the Heart of Software
Eric Evans
 
Working Effectively with Legacy Code (Robert C. Martin Series)
Michael Feathers
 
Agile Estimating and Planning (Robert C. Martin Series)
Mike Cohn
 
Lean Software Development: An Agile Toolkit (The Agile Software Development Series)
Mary Poppendieck and Tom Poppendieck
 
Implementing Lean Software Development: From Concept to Cash (The Addison-Wesley Signature Series)
Mary Poppendieck and Tom Poppendieck
 

Essays

Essay Have I Read?
Teach Yourself Programming in Ten Years
Peter Norvig
Y
They Write the Right Stuff
Charles Fishman
Y
The Humble Programmer
Edsger Dikstra
Y

Management

Book Have I Read?
Peopleware: Productive Projects and Teams
Tom DeMarco
Y

Windows

Book Have I Read?
Microsoft Windows Internals, Fourth Edition: Microsoft Windows Server(TM) 2003, Windows XP, and Windows 2000 (Pro-Developer)
Mark Russinovich and David Solomon
Y
Programming Windows, Fifth Edition
Charles Petzold
Y
Programming Applications for Microsoft Windows
Jeff Richter
Y
Programming Windows With MFC
Jeff Prosise
Y

.Net

Book Have I Read?
Inside C#, Second Edition
Tom Archer and Andrew Whitechapel
Y
CLR via C#, Second Edition (Pro Developer)
Jeff Richter
Y

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Check out my latest book, the essential, in-depth guide to performance for all .NET developers:

Writing High-Performance.NET Code, 2nd Edition by Ben Watson. Available for pre-order:

Instant Searching and Filtering in .Net – Part 4

This is the final part of my series on instant searching and filtering using C#. The only further issue that I wanted to cover was efficiently using a ListView when the items  will change so often.

ListViews already have the concept of a virtual mode, where the consumer of the class must supply the items that are displayed.

When the VirtualMode property is set to true, you also need to set the VirtualListSize property to tell the control how many items it needs to think it has.

With this simple starting point, we can have something like the following:

 

   1: _listControl.VirtualMode = true;
   2: _listControl.RetrieveVirtualItem += 
   3:     new RetrieveVirtualItemEventHandler(list_RetrieveVirtualItem);

and list_RetrieveVirtualItem could look like this:

 

   1: void list_RetrieveVirtualItem(object sender, RetrieveVirtualItemEventArgs e)
   2: {
   3:     e.Item = new ListViewItem();
   4:     e.Item.Text = "Item Text Here";
   5: }

Using this, it would be fairly easy to hook up our filtered results and away we go. But we have a few problems:

  • We don’t want to generate a new ListViewItem every time the list control asks us for one. This is extremely wasteful–thousands of objects would be springing to life and dying constantly, which is a very inefficient use of the garbage collector.
  • On the other hand, we don’t want to cache a ListViewItem object for every single line of text that was indexed. Only a few of them will be on the screen at a time, and we’ve already cached the text, so we should use that.

Therefore, we need a way to efficiently cache a limited number of ListViewItem objects and use them as necessary, updating their Text and Tag properties as necessary.

With that introduction, let’s get into the code.

Our own ListView

First things first: there’s a bug in the .Net framework that impacts virtual mode on ListView. So let’s derive our own to resolve it:

 

   1: class QuickList : System.Windows.Forms.ListView
   2: {
   3:     /// <summary>
   4:     /// This is needed to fix a bug in the framework
   5:     /// </summary>
   6:     public new int VirtualListSize
   7:     {
   8:         get
   9:         {
  10:             return base.VirtualListSize;
  11:         }
  12:         set
  13:         {
  14:             if (Items.Count > 0)
  15:             {
  16:                 EnsureVisible(0);
  17:             }
  18:             base.VirtualListSize = value;
  19:         }
  20:     }
  21: }
 

That’s all there is to that. If you would like more information about the bug, Shahar Prish wrote up an excellent description and workarounds.

With that out of the way, most of the action we’re concerned with will take place in a separate class, which I’ll call…

QuickListController

This controller class is responsible for coordinating the filter text, filtered results, and their display in the list control. In my own use of these concepts, I’ve further factored out the filtering mechanism to be outside of this controller, but in this sample it’s better to combine it all for ease of understanding.

So how will this work? We want a cache of only the items that will be displayed. Unfortunately, the ListView control is going to ask us for item 30,775 for example, if we’re scrolled down a huge list. We don’t want to cache 30,775 items when only the surrounding 20 items are displayed. Fortunately, it’s easy to track a minimal number of items if we know the first visible index

Here are the fields and properties we’ll need:

 

   1: class QuickListController
   2: {
   3:     private int _topIndex = -1;
   4:     private int _bottomIndex = -1;
   5:     private IIndexer<string> _indexer;
   6:     private IList<string> _allLines;
   7:     private IList<string> _currentResults;
   8:     private QuickList _listControl;
   9:     List<ListViewItem> _itemCache = new List<ListViewItem>();
  10:     private string _filter;
  11:     
  12:     #region Properties
  13:     public IList<string> CurrentResults
  14:     {
  15:         get
  16:         {
  17:             return _currentResults;
  18:         }
  19:     }
  20:     public string FilterText
  21:     {
  22:         get
  23:         {
  24:             return _filter;
  25:         }
  26:         set
  27:         {
  28:             _filter = value;
  29:         }
  30:     }
  31:     public IIndexer<string> Indexer
  32:     {
  33:         get
  34:         {
  35:             return _indexer;
  36:         }
  37:         set
  38:         {
  39:             _indexer = value;
  40:         }
  41:     }
  42:     public IList<string> AllLines
  43:     {
  44:         get
  45:         {
  46:             return _allLines;
  47:         }
  48:         set
  49:         {
  50:             _allLines = value;
  51:         }
  52:     }
  53:     #endregion
  54:     //methods, etc.
  55: }

Ok, lots of boring code. We track the top and bottom indexes of the visible items, we store our indexer, a list of all the results (for when no text is entered–no point in searching for nothing). _currentResults will point to either _allLines or the actual results. _itemCache is a list of ListViewItem objects that will serve as our cache. And, of course, we need the text we want to filter on.

You’ll notice that the filtered results are now strings instead of bools. In previous articles, we didn’t care about the actual results–just a count of them. Now, we need to display them, so the filtered items are the same as the keys–the lines of the text in a file.

Constructor

Construction is likewise straightforward:

   1: public QuickListController(QuickList list)
   2: {
   3:     _listControl = list;
   4:     _listControl.VirtualMode = true;
   5:     _listControl.CacheVirtualItems += 
   6:         new CacheVirtualItemsEventHandler(list_CacheVirtualItems);
   7:     _listControl.RetrieveVirtualItem += 
   8:         new RetrieveVirtualItemEventHandler(list_RetrieveVirtualItem);
   9: }

Our controller requires an instance of a QuickList object, which it then sets to virtual mode and listens for two events. The first, CacheVirtualItems, is triggered when the ListView needs a new range of objects. It gives us an opportunity to see what the new top and bottom will be and update our cache accordingly.

The RetrieveVirtualItem event is called when the ListView needs to get the item to display. As we’ll see below, handling both of these events is fairly straightforward.

CacheVirtualItems

 

   1: void list_CacheVirtualItems(object sender, CacheVirtualItemsEventArgs e)
   2: {
   3:     _topIndex = e.StartIndex;
   4:     _bottomIndex = e.EndIndex;
   5:  
   6:     int sizeNeeded = _bottomIndex - _topIndex + 2;//extra 2
   7:     int toCreate = sizeNeeded - _itemCache.Count;
   8:     if (toCreate > 0)
   9:     {
  10:         if (_itemCache.Capacity < sizeNeeded)
  11:         {
  12:             _itemCache.Capacity += toCreate;
  13:         }
  14:         for (int i = 0; i < toCreate; i++)
  15:         {
  16:             _itemCache.Add(new ListViewItem());
  17:         }
  18:     }
  19: }

We save the top and bottom indexes (we actually never use the bottom index), and we then calculate how many total items we need, how many new ones we need to create, and then create new ones if necessary.

You’ll notice that there is no mechanism for removing items from the cache. As we know, another name for cache with a bad (no) removal policy is a memory leak, but since the size of this cache is limited by screen characteristics, and in the most dire circumstance shouldn’t be more than a few hundred, we’ll let it slide (just this once).

RetrieveVirtualItem

 

   1: void list_RetrieveVirtualItem(object sender, RetrieveVirtualItemEventArgs e)
   2: {
   3:     if (e.ItemIndex < _topIndex)
   4:     {
   5:         //should never get here
   6:         Debug.Assert(false);
   7:         _topIndex = e.ItemIndex;
   8:     }
   9:     
  10:     e.Item = GetListViewItem(e.ItemIndex, _topIndex);
  11: }

You’ll notice that if block shouldn’t ever be called, but during debugging I did have an instance where that was the case. It may have been a bug that has since been fixed, but I left it in for safety.

The actual work is done another function:

GetListViewItem

 

   1: private ListViewItem GetListViewItem(int itemIndex, int topIndex)
   2: {
   3:     if (itemIndex < 0 || topIndex < 0)
   4:     {
   5:         return null;
   6:     }
   7:     int cacheIndex = itemIndex - topIndex;
   8:     
   9:     Debug.Assert(cacheIndex < _itemCache.Count);
  10:     ListViewItem item = _itemCache[cacheIndex];
  11:     item.Text = _currentResults[itemIndex];
  12:     //could set tag if you have more complex objects
  13:     //item.Tag = _currentResults[itemIndex];
  14:     return item;
  15: }

Now that you understand how this is working, this function is really simple. Again, we do a simple sanity check. We calculate the index into our cache, which is simply the offset from the top index. After retrieving the pre-created item, we set its text (you could also set the item’s tag, color, or any other property here).

Now, some of you are wondering, “but wait, where do you set the VirtualListSize property?” Yes, that is rather important, isn’t it? How is the ListView control supposed to know how many items to ask for? For that matter, where is the actual filtering done?

The Filter

We have one more function, this one a public interface to the class’s consumer:

 

   1: public void RefreshList()
   2: {
   3:     if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(_filter))
   4:     {
   5:         _currentResults = _allLines;
   6:     }
   7:     else
   8:     {
   9:         _currentResults = _indexer.Lookup(_filter);
  10:     }
  11:     _listControl.VirtualListSize = _currentResults.Count;
  12: }

If the filter text is empty, we set our current results to the full set of lines. Otherwise, run the filter. Then we set our control’s virtual size to the number of results.

Conclusion

If you’ve struggled this far, congratulations. If you find anything in any of these articles useful, please leave a comment and let me know! If you find bugs or problems with my approach, I’d love to hear about better ways of accomplishing things.

The project download contains a GUI that hooks up these classes to an easy-to-use interface.

Also, if you’ve found this useful, please Buy me a Lego!

Download the project. (run the GuiSearch project–I changed TestSearch to a library file)

Download Les Misérables for testing.

 

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Writing High-Performance.NET Code, 2nd Edition by Ben Watson. Available for pre-order:

Tip: Mouse back and forward work in Visual Studio 2005 too

You know how you can use the extra mouse buttons to move back and forward in Internet Explorer?

The same shortcuts work in Visual Studio. Suppose you right-click on a function call, and select Go To Definition. Once you’re done looking at the definition, hit the back button on your mouse: You’re taken right back to where you came from!

(The keyboard equivalents are Ctrl+ – and Ctrl+Shift+ -)

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Check out my latest book, the essential, in-depth guide to performance for all .NET developers:

Writing High-Performance.NET Code, 2nd Edition by Ben Watson. Available for pre-order:

digg for developers

I was thinking the other day that there should be a digg-like site that is only for software developers.

Well, it turns out there is! I was analyzing my web traffic and the list of recent referrers. A few were coming from dzone. Apparently, somebody has been submitting some of my articles to this site (thank you!). The site works in much the same way as digg, but the subtopics are programming-related. You can vote up or down various posts. It doesn’t look like it has anywhere near the traffic that digg has, but hopefully it continues to grow.

So if you’re a developer and like to stay on top of new links and articles, get yourself an account on dzone and start contributing and voting.

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Check out my latest book, the essential, in-depth guide to performance for all .NET developers:

Writing High-Performance.NET Code, 2nd Edition by Ben Watson. Available for pre-order:

Easily Getting Last Two Digits of Year

This is an easy one, but some people don’t know it: if you need the last two digits of a year, say 2007, it’s very easy to get, without converting to a string and getting the last two characters:

 

int lastTwo = year % 100;

Now that you know, it’s obvious, right?

And if you want the last three digits? number % 1000. In general:

int lastN = number % (pow(10, digitsRequired));

What about first N digits? similarly easy:

 

int firstTwo = number / 100;
int firstN = number / pow(10,digitsRequired);

 
Now  you know, and knowing if half the battle.

Check out my latest book, the essential, in-depth guide to performance for all .NET developers:

Writing High-Performance.NET Code, 2nd Edition by Ben Watson. Available for pre-order: