Getting the most out of Outlook 2007

I’ve been trying to organize my life lately, and this weekend, I decided to get my Outlook under control–respond, file, or delete the hundreds of e-mails in my inbox, create necessary tasks, delete obsolete ones, reorganize the folder hierarchy, etc. Also, I’ve recently been introduced to the Getting Things Done methodology and was interested in that. Some of these sites use GTD as their basis, but all the tips are useful even if you’re not specifically using Getting Things Done. In any case, all of these are focused on personal productivity.

In addition, I decided to figure out how to use some features more effectively than I do. Like categories. Outlook has always had categories, but they work so much better in the 2007 version. The To-Do bar has also been visible the whole time I’ve had Outlook 2007, but I haven’t used it effectively. Until now.

What follows are some links to articles and blogs that can help rein in Outlook and make it work for you.

Organization Basics

Advanced Organization

Getting Things Done

I’ve recently become interested in this methodology, after reading the recent article in Wired magazine.

General

Macros

Blogs

Got some other really good tips or sites? Did I leave out an area of Outlook? Post them in the comments and I’ll add them to the list.

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